bushidocaps:

Allies of Konoha, the Sand Ninja!

(via lickmeplzzzz)

749 notes

mineralogasm:

Ruizite, Kinoite, Fluorapophyllite-(K) from Christmas Mine, Arizona, USA

mineralogasm:

Ruizite, Kinoite, Fluorapophyllite-(K) from Christmas Mine, Arizona, USA

(Source: mindat.org)

28 notes

randomdraggon:

Buy it here.

SCIENCE!

28 notes

thesubatomic:

The violent reaction between Aluminium and Iodine catalysed in water.

This is why i get followed by the cia cuz they think im going to mix something like this up.

thesubatomic:

The violent reaction between Aluminium and Iodine catalysed in water.

This is why i get followed by the cia cuz they think im going to mix something like this up.

45 notes

antikythera-astronomy:

HR4796A

Nicknamed “The Eye of Sauron” by astronomers, this young star has a ring making it look like Tolkien’s Dark Lord

120 notes

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

magnetic Levitation device by Crealev

100 notes

thenewenlightenmentage:

Chinese scientists search for evidence of dark matter particles with new underground PandaX detector
The new PandaX facility, located deep underground in the southwestern Chinese province of Sichuan, hosts a large liquid-xenon detector designed to search for direct evidence of dark matter interactions with the nuclei of xenon and to observe 136Xe double-beta decay.
The detector’s central vessel was designed to accommodate a staged target volume increase from an initial 120 kg (stage I) to 0.5 t (stage II) and ultimately to a multi-ton scale.
The technical design of the PandaX facility and detector is outlined in a new paper co-authored by Ji Xiangdong, of the Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astronomy and Cosmology at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and published in the Beijing-based journal SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Chinese scientists search for evidence of dark matter particles with new underground PandaX detector

The new PandaX facility, located deep underground in the southwestern Chinese province of Sichuan, hosts a large liquid-xenon detector designed to search for direct evidence of dark matter interactions with the nuclei of xenon and to observe 136Xe double-beta decay.

The detector’s central vessel was designed to accommodate a staged target volume increase from an initial 120 kg (stage I) to 0.5 t (stage II) and ultimately to a multi-ton scale.

The technical design of the PandaX facility and detector is outlined in a new paper co-authored by Ji Xiangdong, of the Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astronomy and Cosmology at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and published in the Beijing-based journal SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy.

Continue Reading

86 notes

scienceyoucanlove:

(fun fact: I have the first and third photographs on my door :) )

Q&A: Scientist Studied His Poop for a Year to Learn About Gut Bugs

Gut microbes may be key to human health, but tracking them proves a tough task.

Karen Weintraub

for National Geographic

PUBLISHED JULY 24, 2014

Where would we be without our gut bugs? These bacteria help us do everything from digesting food to recovering from disease, but scientists are still learning exactly what gut bugs do, and even how to study them.

In the latest report from this inner frontier of science,Lawrence David, formerly a graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his adviser, Eric Alm, tracked their own bodily functions—which largely meant studying their poop and pee—to see what might alter the colonies of bacteria that live in their guts. (Related: "Why Has This Really Common Virus Only Just Been Discovered?")

They used cutting-edge DNA analysis and also perhaps the oldest health metric ever used by humans, studying their own feces. The results of their 2009-2010 adventure are published Thursday in the journal Genome Biology.

National Geographic talked to David, now an assistant professor at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, about the experience and what he learned.

For the most part, were gut bugs pretty stable across time?

The most abundant species you would see for days, weeks, months. We couldn’t find very many lifestyle variables that would cause a new species to show up or disappear.

You write in the study that the biggest change you saw was from an accidental food poisoning.

In about a week, about half the [bacterial] species that had been very abundant became much, much, much less abundant. Many of them dropped to at or below our detection limit.

You also saw some quick changes in gut bugs from eating fiber. Were you intentionally eating fiber to see what would happen?

The subjects were instructed not to alter their diets. The power of our study was that we weren’t telling people, “You have to eat fiber bars for this one week and then we’re going to analyze it.” We said, “Just live your life the way you normally would and we’ll see what we can learn.”

Wait a minute. You refer to the people in your study as “the subjects,” but weren’t they really you and your adviser, Eric Alm?

As scientists, we were trying to be as impartial as possible in how we analyze our data and interpret it. In many ways it was a pilot study. We were trying to figure out what kind of host actions could be tracked and what was feasible to look at in people over time. In a pilot study, we didn’t want people doing things that we ourselves wouldn’t really be comfortable doing.

Are there metrics that will be too difficult to ask future subjects?

Now I know that tracking things like urination [is too onerous]. Compliance would probably be abysmal.

read more from NatGeo

72 notes

randomghost:

"Sandia’s Materials, Devices and Energy Technologies Group developed micro-scale solar photovoltaic cells about the width of a human hair. The cells, which can be mass manufactured with standard semiconductor micro-scale tools, reduce costs, improve efficiency and can be used in new applications, such as embedded in clothing or in the shells of smartphones."
[source]

randomghost:

"Sandia’s Materials, Devices and Energy Technologies Group developed micro-scale solar photovoltaic cells about the width of a human hair. The cells, which can be mass manufactured with standard semiconductor micro-scale tools, reduce costs, improve efficiency and can be used in new applications, such as embedded in clothing or in the shells of smartphones."

[source]

204 notes

scienceyoucanlove:

World’s Largest Freshwater Turtle Nearly Extinct
The last known pair of Yangtze giant softshell turtles mated again in June.
Kaitlin Solimine
for National Geographic
PUBLISHED JULY 1, 2013

The fate of a species is resting on the shells of two turtles at China's Suzhou Zoo.
n June, researchers collected eggs from the last mating pair of the critically endangered Yangtze giant softshell turtle (Rafetus swinhoei) in the hopes that at least one will be fertile.
The 220-pound (100-kilogram) freshwater giant, which spends most of its life burrowing in mud, was once common in its namesake Yangtze River, China’s Lake Taihu and Yunnan Province, and parts of Vietnam.
By the late 1990s, however, human encroachment and poaching for use of the shells in Chinese traditional medicine rapidly depleted the population. Now, a total of four animals are known—two wild males in Vietnam and the mating pair at Suzhou Zoo.
It’s the team’s sixth year of breeding the turtles at the zoo, which is not far from Shanghai. So far, none of the eggs have hatched.
Researchers can’t pinpoint the reason for the infertility, but they suspect a combination of factors, including poor sperm quality due to the male’s age—roughly a hundred—an improper mating posture, and stress on the female.
Because the turtles are the last in captivity and too much human interaction could kill them, sperm samples cannot be taken nor tests run. Still, scientists are hoping that this year will be the lucky one. (Related: "Pictures: Turtles Hunted, Traded, Squeezed Out of Their Habitats.")
"The resurrection of this iconic species in the wild, the largest freshwater turtle in the world, would be a symbol of hope," said Gerald Kuchling, founder of the Australia-based group Turtle Conservancyand a turtle-reproduction expert.
"Miraculous" Find
As is the case with many near-extinct species, by the time scientists realized the extent of the turtle’s decline, the species was almost gone.
In 2006, the U.S. nonprofit Turtle Survival Alliance asked Kuchling to establish the sex of the last three captive giant softshell turtles in China, which at the time lived at the Shanghai Zoo, Suzhou Zoo, and Suzhou’s West Garden Buddhist Temple. (Related: “6 of Nature’s Loneliest Animals Looking for Love.”)
When Kuchling landed in China in 2007, the Shanghai Zoo and Buddhist Temple individuals had already died. The Suzhou Zoo male was the last known Chinese survivor. Researchers sent an all-points bulletin to every zoo in the nation in the off chance a turtle had been misidentified.
Their call was answered: A photograph of a turtle at the Changsha Zoo looked promising. Kuchling, along with Lu Shunqing, China director for the Wildlife Conservation Society, traveled to Changsha, where they confirmed it was a Yangtze giant softshell—and a female to boot.
"It’s a bit miraculous we found her," said Emily King, the Suzhou Zoo breeding program’s field assistant.
read more from NatGeo 

scienceyoucanlove:

World’s Largest Freshwater Turtle Nearly Extinct

The last known pair of Yangtze giant softshell turtles mated again in June.

Kaitlin Solimine

for National Geographic

PUBLISHED JULY 1, 2013

The fate of a species is resting on the shells of two turtles at China's Suzhou Zoo.

n June, researchers collected eggs from the last mating pair of the critically endangered Yangtze giant softshell turtle (Rafetus swinhoei) in the hopes that at least one will be fertile.

The 220-pound (100-kilogram) freshwater giant, which spends most of its life burrowing in mud, was once common in its namesake Yangtze River, China’s Lake Taihu and Yunnan Province, and parts of Vietnam.

By the late 1990s, however, human encroachment and poaching for use of the shells in Chinese traditional medicine rapidly depleted the population. Now, a total of four animals are known—two wild males in Vietnam and the mating pair at Suzhou Zoo.

It’s the team’s sixth year of breeding the turtles at the zoo, which is not far from Shanghai. So far, none of the eggs have hatched.

Researchers can’t pinpoint the reason for the infertility, but they suspect a combination of factors, including poor sperm quality due to the male’s age—roughly a hundred—an improper mating posture, and stress on the female.

Because the turtles are the last in captivity and too much human interaction could kill them, sperm samples cannot be taken nor tests run. Still, scientists are hoping that this year will be the lucky one. (Related: "Pictures: Turtles Hunted, Traded, Squeezed Out of Their Habitats.")

"The resurrection of this iconic species in the wild, the largest freshwater turtle in the world, would be a symbol of hope," said Gerald Kuchling, founder of the Australia-based group Turtle Conservancyand a turtle-reproduction expert.

"Miraculous" Find

As is the case with many near-extinct species, by the time scientists realized the extent of the turtle’s decline, the species was almost gone.

In 2006, the U.S. nonprofit Turtle Survival Alliance asked Kuchling to establish the sex of the last three captive giant softshell turtles in China, which at the time lived at the Shanghai Zoo, Suzhou Zoo, and Suzhou’s West Garden Buddhist Temple. (Related: “6 of Nature’s Loneliest Animals Looking for Love.”)

When Kuchling landed in China in 2007, the Shanghai Zoo and Buddhist Temple individuals had already died. The Suzhou Zoo male was the last known Chinese survivor. Researchers sent an all-points bulletin to every zoo in the nation in the off chance a turtle had been misidentified.

Their call was answered: A photograph of a turtle at the Changsha Zoo looked promising. Kuchling, along with Lu Shunqing, China director for the Wildlife Conservation Society, traveled to Changsha, where they confirmed it was a Yangtze giant softshell—and a female to boot.

"It’s a bit miraculous we found her," said Emily King, the Suzhou Zoo breeding program’s field assistant.

read more from NatGeo 

195 notes